Here is the course catalogue for our DD Students:

Some of the courses are mandatory – like two English courses, Us History, American Government and Economics, and some others are electives – so that the student can pick his favorite subject from our catalogue and customize his curriculum.

Course Descriptions

 

English and Literature

 

English I

In this class you are going to participate in a series of online tutorials, state-of-the-art learning modules, oral and written examinations, and creative projects.  You will become more knowledgeable about everyday English vocabulary and grammar and highly proficient in practical conversation and day-to-day interaction.  You will acquire a variety of skills related to both comprehension and communication in everyday English.

Prerequisites: None. Credits 1.0

Major Themes Covered:

Semester 1

  • Students will be able to demonstrate, orally and in writing, a clear understanding of everyday English grammar.
  • Students will learn strategies for clear and articulate pronunciation of English vocabulary.
  • Students will learn how to successfully converse in diverse English-language settings and environments.
  • Students will acquire a variety of skills related to both comprehension and communication in everyday English.
  • Students will master the following grammatical structures: the verb to be, pronoun and noun forms, possessive forms, the simple present tense and the present continuous tense.
  • Students will master vocabulary related to the following themes: greetings and introductions, family and friends, describing your home, things we can/can’t do, exchanging information, how much/how many, describing daily routines, and what’s happening.

Semester 2

  • Students will continue to learn strategies for clear and articulate pronunciation of English vocabulary.
  • Students will master the following grammatical structures: the simple past tense, the present perfect tense, adverbs, modals, and future forms.
  • Students will master vocabulary related to the following themes: greetings and introductions, talking about the past, talking about the future, things we have done, routines and actions, past experiences, let’s trade apartments, and comparing people and things.
  • Students will complete creative projects throughout the course where they will be required to apply the knowledge of the English language that they are acquiring and demonstrate proficiency in both written and oral form.

 

English II

In this class you will continue to participate in a series of online tutorials, state-of-the-art learning modules, oral and written examinations, and creative projects.  You will continue to improve your English vocabulary and grammar skills as well as become proficient in more formal settings.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 1 or the equivalent. Credits 1.0

Major Themes Covered:

Semester 1

  • Students will continue to learn strategies for clear and articulate pronunciation of English vocabulary as well as develop skills necessary for communication in more formal settings.
  • Students will review all grammatical structures from English 1.
  • Students will learn how to successfully converse in diverse English-language settings and environments.
  • Students will acquire a variety of skills related to both comprehension and communication in everyday English.
  • Students will master the following grammatical structures: past continuous, past perfect, conditionals, the passive, reported speech and relative clauses.
  • Students will master vocabulary related to the following themes: giving and getting instructions, comparing people and things, past and present, describing past experiences, personal history, plans/ promises/predictions, travel, what if, and hopes and regrets, what did they say, on vacation.

Semester 2

  • Students will continue to learn strategies for clear and articulate pronunciation of English vocabulary as well as develop skills necessary for communication in more formal settings.
  • Students will review the grammatical structures taught in Semester 1 and will learn how to apply higher order thinking skills when dealing with written and spoken texts.
  • Students will master vocabulary related to the following themes: community, career trends, house and home, inventions, the environment, finance, safety preparedness and the arts.
  • Students will complete creative projects throughout the course where they will be required to apply the knowledge of the English language that they are acquiring and demonstrate proficiency in both written and oral form.

 

English III

The purpose of this course is to give students the tools to understand and express who they are and where they want to go. By the end of the course, each student’s portfolio of writings will provide a descriptive self-portrait of a young adult growing up.

 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 2 or the equivalent.  Credits 1.0

Major Themes Covered:

Semester 1

  • Learning styles and Time management
  • Literacy history
  • Brainstorming and Creative Writing
  • Reading comprehension
  • Vocabulary development
  • Reading skills (poetry, prose, nonfiction, songs)
  • Interviewing skills
  • Writing summaries and personal responses to literature
  • Media literacy
  • Punctuation
  • Reading and analyzing a novel
  • Story elements (character, plot, setting, point of view, theme)
  • Book review
  • Writing process (brainstorming, drafting, revising, editing)
  • Narrative, expository and persuasive essays
  • Analyzing writing prompts, timed writings and scoring rubrics

Semester 2

  • Appreciating and responding to poetry and understanding poetic devices (rhyme, stanza)
  • Understanding figurative language (metaphor, simile, imagery, personification, hyperbole, onomatopoeia)
  • Vocabulary development
  • Real-world literacy
  • Self-assessment and interest inventory
  • Goal-setting (personal, school, extracurricular, career) and Career exploration
  • Fact/opinion and Cause/effect
  • Parody
  • Propaganda
  • Speech-writing techniques
  • Listening and speaking skills
  • Research skills and Bibliography

English IV

The purpose of this course is to provide students integrated English language arts study in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language for college and career preparation and readiness.

 

Major Concepts Covered:

Semester 1

  • Theme, Thematic analysis, Thesis Statement
  • Idea Development
  • Proper use of conventions
  • Characterization
  • Plot analysis
  • Six Traits of Writing
  • Narrative Writing Process
  • Proper Use of Conventions
  • Text Structures
  • Figurative language
  • Tone
  • Mood
  • Diction
  • Connotation and Denotation
  • Structure

 

Semester 2

  • Informational Texts, Text Features
  • Context
  • Compare and Contrast
  • Argument analysis, Argument writing process
  • Characteristics of an Effective Claim, Counterclaim
  • Appeals to Logic, Emotion, and Ethics
  • Logical fallacies
  • Research skills, Ethical Researching and Writing Practices
  • Naturalism
  • Dialect
  • Figurative language
  • Syntax

 

Social Sciences

American History

In this course, you will look at some of the most profound questions that thoughtful Americans still debate. You will research many important events throughout the history of the United States of America. In the process, you will witness the development of America from its first settlers to today’s superpower status.

Prerequisites: None.  Credits 1.0

Major Concepts Covered:

Semester 1

  • Early settlement
  • Colonization of America
  • French and Indian War
  • Historian’s Tools
  • Colonial protest to British policies
  • American Revolution
  • Declaration of Independence
  • Founding Fathers
  • Articles of Confederation
  • Constitutional Convention
  • Early Challenges to the New Nation
  • Louisiana Purchase
  • War of 1812

Semester 2

  • Westward expansion
  • Manifest Destiny
  • Indian Removal
  • Expansion of slavery
  • The Mexican-American War
  • The Industrial Revolution
  • Expansion of democracy
  • Second Great Awakening
  • Transcendentalism
  • Women’s Suffrage
  • Abolition
  • Civil War
  • Reconstruction

American Government

You will gain a greater understanding on the history of the United States of America’s beginnings, and knowledge of how government functions at the local, state and national levels.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 1 or the equivalent.  Credits .5

Major Concepts Covered:

  • Origins of Modern Government and Types of Government
  • Enlightenment Influences
  • Declaration of Independence
  • Articles of Confederation
  • The Constitution
  • Branches of Government, Checks and Balances and Federalism
  • Judicial Branch, the Court System, and the Supreme Court
  • The Amendments and the Bill of Rights
  • Jury Duty
  • Civil Rights, Civil Liberties and the Patriot Act
  • The Legislative Branch, Powers of Congress and Congressional Elections
  • Role of Political Parties and Interest Groups
  • How a Bill Becomes a Law
  • The Executive Branch, Presidential Elections and the Cabinet
  • The Media and Politics
  • Foreign, Domestic and Economic Policy
  • Modern Day Presidents and Presidential Impeachment
  • State Governments and State Constitutions
  • Citizenship and the Rights and Responsibilities of United States Citizens
  • Voting Rights and Responsibilities
  • Function and Role of Local Governments

 

Economics

In this course, you will recognize examples of economics in your daily life. You will see how the economic choices of larger groups, like businesses and governments, affect you and others.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 1 or the equivalent.  Credits .5

Major Concepts Covered:

  • Study of Economics, Scarcity and Choice
  • Opportunity Cost
  • Supply and Demand
  • Money, Wants and Needs
  • Career and Income
  • Taxes
  • Saving and Investing, Credit
  • Budgets
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Factors of Production
  • Business Organization, Market Competition
  • Marginal Cost Analysis
  • Production Possibilities
  • Business Cycle
  • Government and the Economy
  • The Federal Reserve
  • Monetary Policy and Fiscal Policy
  • Economic Goals and Measurement
  • Comparative Advantage and Trade
  • Inflation
  • Circular Flow
  • Public Policy Analysis

Electives

Psychology 1

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the subfields within psychology.

Prerequisites: None.  Credits 1.0

Major Concepts Covered:

  • The evolution of psychology
  • The biological bases of behavior
  • Sensation and perception
  • Consciousness and dreams
  • Human development
  • Learning and memory and intelligence
  • Psychological disorders and therapy
  • Social psychology

Life Management Skills

The purpose of this course is to produce health literate students that make sound decisions and take positive actions for healthy and effective living. The course is wellness oriented and emphasizes responsible decision-making and planning for a healthy lifestyle.

Prerequisites: None.  Credits 1.0

Major Themes Covered:

  • Responsible decision-making
  • Goal-setting, including personal health and individual wellness planning
  • Positive emotional development, including the prevention of depression and suicide
  • Communication, interpersonal and coping skills, including prevention of violence, gangs, bullying and Internet safety
  • Nutrition and physical activity
  • Tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use and abuse
  • Safety education, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automatic external defibrillator (AED), first aid for obstructed airway, and injury prevention
  • Prevention of child abuse and neglect
  • Disease prevention and control
  • Analyzing health information and consumer knowledge
  • Health-related community resources
  • Health advocacy skills
  • Teen dating violence and abuse prevention

Introduction to Social Media

The purpose of this course is to learn how to interact on various social media platforms in order to survive and thrive in this age of digital communication. In this course, you’ll learn the ins and outs of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and more. You’ll also discover other types of social media you may not have been aware of and how to use them for your benefit—personally, academically, and eventually professionally as well. If you thought social media platforms were just a place to keep track of friends and share personal photos, this course will show you how to use these resources in much more powerful ways.

Major Concepts Covered:

  • Clearly define social media
  • Communicate a solid understanding of social media and how it has changed over time
  • Identify various types of social media
  • Identify the basic uses of social media
  • Discuss the positive and negative influences of social media on individuals, businesses, and society as a whole

Hospitality and Tourism

This course will introduce students to the hospitality and tourism industry, including hotel and restaurant management, cruise ships, spas, resorts, theme parks, and other areas. Student will learn about key hospitality issues, the development and management of tourist locations, event planning, marketing, and environmental issues related to leisure and travel. The course also examines some current and future trends in the field.

Major Concepts Covered:

  • Define the parameters and characteristics of the hospitality and tourism industry
  • Examine the areas of business that make up the hospitality and tourism industry
  • Trace the development of the hospitality and tourism industry
  • Discuss the importance of service in the industry
  • Identify and discuss several current trends affecting the hospitality and tourism industry

SAT Prep

In this course, you will practice thinking strategies, build verbal competence, and sharpen your mathematics reasoning.  You will acquire essential test-taking strategies.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 2 or the equivalent.  Credits 1.0

Major Themes Covered:

  • SAT vocabulary, requirements and facts
  • Vocabulary: word meaning, roots, prefixes and suffixes, sentence types, sentence completion, literary terms and transitional words
  • Critical reading
  • Inferences
  • Point of view
  • Author’s tone and attitude
  • Long and short reading passages
  • Understanding reading passages and Determining main idea
  • Web use for self enhancement in vocabulary
  • Algebraic expressions and Algebraic mistakes
  • Changing word problems into math problems
  • Math – Rate, Distance, Work, Cost and Mixture problems
  • Simultaneous Equations
  • Factoring Quadratics
  • Inequalities
  • Binomials and Trinomials
  • Direct and Inverse Variation
  • Functions
  • Probability
  • Rational and Radical Equations
  • Graphing equations and absolute value
  • Geometry including: coordinate geometry, Pythagorean theorem, parallel and transversal lines, area and perimeter, triangles, rectangles, polygons and circles surface area
  • Permutations and combinations: Alphanumeric problems, Logic, Graphs/Charts
  • Writing Essays: using essay prompts, brainstorming and planning, word choice, elaboration
    sentence type
  • Grammar: identifying errors and punctuation